The online home for the primary care professionals managing patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related diseases.

Evidence in Practice

Wednesday, 07 June 2017
Offering a year-long programme of weight loss classes could prevent an additional 1786 cases of cardiovascular disease for every 100,000 people compared to the existing 12-week NHS programme, according to a new study published in the Lancet.
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Wednesday, 07 June 2017
Men and women suffering from heart failure have a higher risk of death than people with some common types of cancer, according to results from the primary care database study. Heart failure is also accompanied by much higher rates of co-morbidity.
Tuesday, 30 May 2017
Muscle-related symptoms are less commonly reported when patients and their doctors are unaware that statin therapy is being used, compared to when they are aware, according to a new study on ASCOT-LLA trial data.
Friday, 19 May 2017
Treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) with phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors is associated with a markedly reduced risk of death, and hospitalisation for heart failure. A team from the Karolinksa Institute in Stockholm conducted a nationwide cohort study which included over 43,000 men with a first MI in Sweden.
Friday, 19 May 2017
New research from a large national database shows an increased risk of adverse outcomes in babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes when compared with non-diabetic mothers. The database of all 797,346 deliveries in France in 2012 included 57,629 (7.24%) mothers with gestational diabetes. There was an increased risk of a number of complications for mothers with gestational diabetes compared with non-diabetic mothers.
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Friday, 19 May 2017
The direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been showing promise in trials in venous thromboembolism (VTE) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We provide details from the EINSTEIN CHOICE and COMPASS trials.
Tuesday, 11 April 2017
Painkillers considered harmless by the general public are associated with increased risk of cardiac arrest, according to recent research.
Tuesday, 11 April 2017
Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with intensive medical treatment using medications and lifestyle therapies, according to a new study. Up to 40% of study participants were able to stay in remission three months after stopping diabetes medications.
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