The online home for the primary care professionals managing patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related diseases.

Evidence in Practice

Thursday, 07 February 2019
Consumption of moderate amounts of full fat dairy products is associated with lower risk of mortality and major cardiovascular disease events in a diverse multinational cohort, in a study published recently in the Lancet.
Thursday, 07 February 2019
Results from the DECLARE study show that the SGLT-2 inhibitor dapagliflozin reduces hospitalisation for heart failure or CV death with no increase in major CV events compared with placebo in a broad population of over 17,000 patients with type 2 diabetes. These are important findings, and more or less consistent with findings noted with other SGLT-2 inhibitors.
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Thursday, 07 February 2019
Loss of muscle and body weight (or cachexia) is associated with disability after stroke, in the first study to prospectively investigate the development of cachexia in patients after acute stroke. The study showed that the amount of skeletal muscle throughout the body declines after stroke, which could require treatment options such as dietary supplementation and exercise training to prevent muscle wasting.
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Thursday, 17 January 2019
Approximately one third of all stroke patients have diabetes, according to a large meta-analysis and literature review. Diabetes is associated with poorer stroke outcomes compared with people without diabetes.
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Thursday, 17 January 2019
A new study shows that asking patients simple questions about their weight at the ages of 20 and 40 provides valuable information to aid prediction of future cardiovascular disease.
Thursday, 17 January 2019
Postmenopausal women who suffer complete tooth loss may be at higher risk of developing future hypertension. A recent study that edentulism (complete tooth loss) may serve as an early warning sign for increased hypertension risk.
Wednesday, 12 December 2018
A recent summary of Cochrane reviews shows that lifestyle changes (including as a minimum: healthy eating, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood sugar levels) are the only intervention with enough evidence to show possible health improvements for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and their babies.
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Wednesday, 12 December 2018
Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, according to a study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. Filling a prescription for antidepressants, which was used in this study as an indicator of depression, was associated with a three-fold greater risk of atrial fibrillation. However, medication was not responsible for the high frequency of atrial fibrillation in depressed people.

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