The online home for the primary care professionals managing patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related diseases.

Editorial

Thursday, 27 January 2011
The new coalition government of the United Kingdom (UK) has announced plans to change the NHS radically in England. The Department of Health has published two important documents – Equity and excellence: liberating the NHS and Liberating the NHS: commissioning for patients. The implications for primary and secondary care, and for local authorities, mental health services and community providers, will be enormous. The changes are taking place at a rapid pace and every manager and clinician in the NHS will need to keep abreast of developments as they will affect the way in which we all deliver services in the future.
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects 3-5% of the population over 60 years of age. Many patients with PAD are unaware of their diagnosis, and hence may not have mentionedthe classical symptoms to their GP. The Edinburgh questionnaire is a validated tool thathelps identify susceptible patients. The questionnaire was administered to patients routinelyattending annual influenza immunisation clinics, in order to identify patients potentially at risk ofPAD. In all, 2.9% of the >65yr cohort were identified by the questionnaire as at risk of PAD.Opportunity was made for these patients to have their risk factors reviewed, and managementwas adjusted in line with the Target PAD algorithm. Reducing the risk factor profile of suchpatients improves quality of life scores, morbidity, and mortality. Periodic screening of an 'atrisk'population may identify individuals who would gain considerable benefit from furtherevidence-based management.
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
Depression is common after a stroke. All stroke patients should have their mood assessed. A range of evidence-based interventions may be used, and guidelines should be implemented since failure to treat depression leads to poorer outcomes in rehabilitation and recovery.
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
Stroke is the third commonest cause of adult death and the leading cause of complex disability in the UK. This article will discuss the importance of the early recognition of stroke and transient ischaemic attack and the role of primary care staff in implementing national guidelines. Practical case study examples are included.
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
The evidence for, and usefulness of, once-weekly exenatide (Bydureon) are discussed in this review. It may be initiated in primary care since it has effects on glucose lowering and global cardiometabolic risk
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
Prominent consequences of the Health and Social Care Bill which is now in the committee stage of the House of Lords will be the increased commissioning of cardiac services and changes in how they are delivered. This Bill, although establishing an NHS Commissioning Board to provide commissioning guidance, intends to increase markedly GPs' power to commission services. Monitor, the non-departmental public body, will be developed into an economic regulator to oversee access and competition within the NHS.
Category: Editorial
Thursday, 27 January 2011
Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is an important risk factor for stroke. Early recognition of symptoms and timely secondary prevention significantly reduce stroke risk. We review current evidence and guidelines for early management and treatment of TIA, including early antiplatelet therapy, specialist review, and recognition and treatment of other risk factors. The roles of carotid artery and brain imaging are also considered.
Category: Editorial

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