The online home for the primary care professionals managing patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related diseases.

Editorial

Friday, 14 October 2011
Ovarian cysts are found in women and girls of all ages. They are usually asymptomatic, and most are benign and transient. Testing for tumour markers and risk of malignancy indices may help to predict the possibility of cancer, but imaging on ultrasound (US) remains the primary method of evaluating ovarian cysts.
Category: Editorial
Friday, 14 October 2011
Measuring blood pressure (BP) is one of the commonest tests we carry out in primary care – generally taking several measurements with a digital BP monitor on at least two clinic visits before diagnosing hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has traditionally been used in secondary care hypertension clinics, and in some larger general practices. But new guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence are making ambulatory monitoring part of routine practice for the diagnosis of hypertension in primary care. What are the new guidelines recommending and why the change to ABPM?
Category: Editorial
Friday, 14 October 2011
It is clear that hospital admission causes many preventable deaths from venous thromboembolism (VTE) yet the general public and, I would suggest, primary care health workers, still think of air travel as the main risk factor. Is there a role for primary care in helping to reduce the numbers of patients with hospital-acquired VTE?
Category: Editorial
Friday, 30 September 2011
People with advanced kidney disease are required to make many choices about their treatment throughout the journey of this disease. Opting not to have dialysis or to withdraw from treatment is a difficult decision and there are many factors that influence patients' decisions. For those who choose not to have dialysis, the implications need to be understood by the patient, their family and carers and healthcare professionals involved in their care. This article provides an update on this important issue to equip primary care professionals with a clear understanding of end-of-life care for patients with advanced kidney disease.
Category: Editorial
Friday, 30 September 2011
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a multifaceted disease that has several associated complications. Anaemia is one of the most common complications that can develop early in the course of the disease process. It is associated with increased mortality,increased hospitalisation rates, and reduced quality of life. Lower levels of kidney function are associated with lower haemoglobin (Hb) levels and a higher prevalence and severity of anaemia.
Category: Editorial
Friday, 30 September 2011
Category: Editorial

Article search and filter