The online home for the primary care professionals managing patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and related diseases.

Editorial

Sunday, 17 March 2013
A variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) statin prescribing strategies are advocated for use in primary care. We defined four strategies: assorted drugs and doses (current practice); fixed doses targeting all men or women aged >55 years; targeting those at high Framingham CVD risk; and tailoring dose according to risk stratification. By combining price and potency data with our CVD patient risks database, we modelled potential benefit (myocardial infarctions [MIs] prevented), cost and numbers expected to be treated for each strategy.
Category: Editorial
Sunday, 17 March 2013
Important modifications to the NICE clinical guideline on management of hypertension include changes in definitions of the stages of hypertension, greater use of ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring, changes in treatment recommendations for those aged over 80 and changes in antihypertensive drug treatment recommendations.
Category: Editorial
Wednesday, 19 December 2012
Issues and challenges in hypertension management today Dr Chris Arden GP, Chandlers Ford; GPSI Cardiology, Southampton Most hypertensive patients fail to achieve their target blood pressure despite treatment. As a result, they have a significantly increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Primary care professionals can correct this situation, reducing morbidity and mortality through accurate blood pressure measurement and effective treatment, often with more than one drug. The availability of a new angiotensin receptor blocker, Azilsartan medoxomil, provides an important addition to the choice of available treatment. This video offers primary care professionals a focussed review of high blood pressure, its measurement and modern treatment. This sponsored video has been organised and funded by Takeda UK  Prescribing Information for Edarbi®-(azilsartan medoxomil) can be seen hereCode: AZL121001d. Date of prep: December 2012
Category: Editorial
Monday, 17 December 2012
There were plenty of examples of both intellectual and communication skills at the Primary Care Cardiovascular Journal (PCCJ) and British Journal of Primary Care Nursing (BJPCN) conference, held at Scarman House, University of Warwick on the 16th-17th November 2012. The theme was 'Issues and answers in cardiovascular disease: applying the evidence in primary care today'.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 17 December 2012
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment is a central part of the strategy for identification and treatment of high-risk cases, as was recognised in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on lipid modification. A national strategy devised by the Department of Health for screening all individuals aged between 40 and 75 years exists in the UK though implementation and uptake have been variable. Unfortunately, in screening programmes the greatest uptake tends to be among the white population, wealthier people and women rather than among those groups in which CVD is over-represented: men, poor individuals and those from ethnic minorities. This has posed a great challenge to risk screening but non-traditional approaches including those in places of worship, pharmacies and communally-led initiatives seem to lead to greater success.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 17 December 2012
At least 22% of men and women in the UK are obese. All health professionals need to be skilled in the initial management of obesity. Behaviour change is core to any strategy, as are brief interventions that incorporate advice on physical activity and healthy eating. Training in primary care needs greater emphasis for the future management of obesity.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 17 December 2012
The study found a significant prevalence of sub-clinical atrial fibrillation (AF) within the community. AF confers a five-fold risk of stroke, and the risk of death is doubled in AF-related stroke.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 17 December 2012
There are now four agents in the new class of glucose-lowering agents called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4 inhibitors) available in the UK. They are, in order of launch in the UK, sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin and linagliptin. Several others are in the pipeline and are likely to be launched before long. This article will discuss their place in treating diabetes and the differences between them.
Category: Editorial

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